09.06.17 Weekly Read

June 9, 2017 Marina Mitrashov

This week's reads are all about innovation and growth in the hospitality industry, with a few interesting examples on the importance of thinking outside of the box. We have a blog post by Snapshot’s head of marketing, Margaret Ady, on how to evaluate technology so that you can fail fast to succeed better. We see how Airbnb just made check-in easier for guest and hosts alike, with a low-tech but brilliant feature. We take a look at the next evolution of Expedia, from web company to platform. And we finish off with the entry of fashion designer Karl Lagerfield to the industry. 


How To Evaluate Technology So That You Can Fail Fast & Succeed

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The only way humans learn to walk is by falling. Over and over and over again. We are creatures programmed to learn through failure. Over time, though, we condition ourselves to run from risk. To play it safe, become book smart for the grade, avoid crashing and burning at all cost. This is not a recipe for success. Failure is a necessary ingredient for innovation. 

Read more on our blog 


 Airbnb Makes Checking in Easier

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Airbnb is rolling out a new feature today that will make check-in easier for guests and hosts alike.

Read on Tech Cranch 


How Expedia Sees the Future in Sharing its Technology

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Expedia has made a deal in recent years about its stated goal of moving from being a web company to a technology platform. Part of this shift been the development of tools and services for hotel chains.

Tnooz spoke to Cyril Ranque, Expedia Group President of Lodging Partner Services, to get an update on some of the initiatives and insight into the current relationship between online travel agencies and hotel brands.

Read on Tnooz


Non-Hotel Businesses are Getting into Hotels: Why?

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Those who have been in the hotel business for years know how unglamorous it can be. At the same time, the hotel industry has glamorous overtones. Given the glamorous side of hotels, it makes a certain amount of sense that fashion and retail brands are pushing into the industry. Our first reaction might be one of dismissal. The fashion designer Karl Lagerfield, for example, with his iconic white ponytail and black gloves — what does he know about the hotel business?

Read on Hospitailty Net